The Difference Between: Employment, Business and Labor Law

With new laws for employee privacy rights, hiring practices, tax dodging and even disability accommodations changing from one year to the next, it can be helpful to have an overarching framework to sort through these different regulations. Labor, Employment and Business Law  The most accessible way of thinking about the smorgasbord of all of these laws is by breaking them off into three areas: labor law, employment law and business law. Labor Law  Labor law in many respects is the most specific general domain of law. Labor law relates to laws linking labor unions, employees and employers. On the macro level, the National Labor Relations Act is probably the most important piece of legislation that lynchpins all of the laws that dictate an employee's right to collectively organize into trade unions. Rules governing collective bargaining, higher wages and better working conditions, and joint action like labor strikes are all protected under the National Labor Relations Act…
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5 Reasons Why You Need an Employment Lawyer

Employment law is the field of law that covers the legal relationship between an employer and employee. Employment law deals with the employees' right to collectively bargain and workplace safety issues. Disputes over the minimum wage, maximum working hours and, importantly, civil rights and discriminatory hiring practices are all within the purview of an employment lawyer. Workplace Discrimination and EEOC  You should contact an employment lawyer if you feel that you have been discriminated against based on your race, gender or disability. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that specifically looks into cases of workplace discrimination. In 2011, the EEOC added sex discrimination to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. This means that employers aren't legally allowed to discriminate against you for reasons of sexual orientation. If you suffered discrimination or sexual harassment from an employer based on your religion, age, or ethnicity…
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Can You Sue a Judge?

Each day judges make decisions that can positively or negatively affect an individuals life. Judges who work in civil courts make decisions that can cost one party money. Those who work in criminal courts can send individuals to jail, cost them their jobs, or negatively impact their day-to-day life. In most court cases, a judge must side with one party or the other. In short, there are many people who leave a court room angry with a judge, however, many often wonder whether they can sue a judge. If you feel a judge was bias during the course of a trial, you may be wondering if suing the judge is an option. The answer isn't simple, in most cases, no judges can not be sued, but there are certain circumstances in which judges can be held responsible for unjust actions.

Can You Sue a Judge?

In most cases, no, you cannot sue a judge. Generally speaking, judges are protected by a doctrine c…

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